Oncology Research

Team DDC

DNA Damage in Cancer

Often termed as a disease of the genome, cancer is the result of random acquisition of mutations that activate oncogenes and inactivate tumor suppressors. Consequently, cellular processes including cell cycle control, transcription, apoptosis and DNA repair are affected, conferring incremental growth advantages to cells and fomenting tumorigenesis.

Team RSC

RNA Splicing in Cancer

Our team is seeking to identify key molecular mechanisms that generate mRNA splicing abnormalities in cancer. Splicing of mRNA is a crucial process in eukaryotic gene expression regulation. In addition to canonical splicing, which leads to the inclusion of constitutive exons into the mature mRNA, the transcriptome is subject to alternative splicing. More than 90% of eukaryotic mRNAs undergo alternative splicing, giving rise to multiple protein-coding isoforms from a single precursor mRNA. Alternative splicing is therefore a major determinant for proteome diversity and organism complexity.

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